Mop with rotational wringing mechanism

US 10 231 594 B2

Assignee
INGENIOUS DESIGNS LLC
Inventors
Joy Mangano, Thomas James Philpott, Robert Patrick Warren
Filing date
September 28 2015
Publication date
March 19 2019
Table of contents
Classifications
CPC: A47L13/14, A47L13/142, A47L13/20, A47L13/24, A47L13/252
IPC: A47L13/14, A47L13/142, A47L13/20, A47L13/24, A47L13/252

A mop includes a mop pole, a quick connect mechanism mounted to the bottom of the mop pole and capable of attaching to a mop head, a lower handle grip mounted around a lower portion of the mop pole and configured to move axially along the mop pole, the lower handle grip being capable of attached to a mop head, an upper handle grip at least partially mounted around an upper portion of the mop pole and configured to move axially along the mop pole, and a rotational mechanism capable of imparting rotation into the mop pole in response to axial movement of the upper handle grip.

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Claims

1. A mop comprising:
a mop pole;
a lower handle grip mounted around a lower portion of the mop pole and configured to move axially along the mop pole;
an upper handle grip at least partially mounted around an upper portion of the mop pole and configured to move axially along the mop pole; and
a rotational mechanism capable of imparting rotation into the mop pole in response to the axial movement of the upper handle grip, wherein the rotational mechanism comprises:
two or more inserts attached to internal walls of the upper handle grip, the two or more inserts including prongs;
a rotatable portion attached to a top end of the mop pole, the rotatable portion including a set of teeth; and
a rotating element having grooves and another set of teeth, wherein
as the upper handle grip is moved axially along the mop pole, the prongs of the inserts catch the grooves of the rotating element and cause the rotating element to rotate, and
during rotation of the rotating element, the teeth of the rotating element catch the teeth of the rotatable portion thereby imparting a rotation into the mop pole.

Show 12 dependent claims

14. A method of wringing out a mop having a rotational mechanism capable of imparting rotation into the mop pole in response to the axial movement of the upper handle grip, the method comprising:
sliding a lower handle grip along an axis of a mop pole to its top-most position on the mop pole; and
repeatedly sliding an upper handle grip upward and downward along an axis of a mop pole, wherein
a downward movement of the upper handle grip causes the rotational mechanism to impart a rotation into the mop pole,
the rotation into the mop pole rotates a bottom of a mop head relative to a top of the mop head, and
successive downward movements of the upper handle grip each cause further rotation of the bottom of the mop head relative to the top of the mop head.

Show 4 dependent claims

19. A method of wringing out a mop having a rotational mechanism capable of imparting rotation into the mop pole in response to the axial movement of the upper handle grip, the method comprising:
sliding a lower handle grip along an axis of a mop pole to its bottom-most position on the mop pole; and
repeatedly sliding an upper handle grip upward and downward along an axis of a mop pole, wherein
an upward movement of the upper handle grip causes the rotational mechanism to impart a rotation into the mop pole,
the rotation into the mop pole rotates a bottom of a mop head relative to a top of the mop head, and
successive upward movements of the upper handle grip each cause further rotation of the bottom of the mop head relative to the top of the mop head.

Description

This application claims benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 62/159,099, filed May 8, 2015, and U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 62/159,475, filed May 11, 2015, both of which are incorporated, in their entirety, by this reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present disclosure relates to a durable cleaning mop, the mop capable of wringing water and cleaning solution out of a saturated string-type, braided cord mop head.

BACKGROUND

Mops are an essential cleaning tool for many households and businesses. Over time, improvement of mops and related technologies has resulted in several categories of mops, each with specialized capabilities and intended uses. Generally, mop categories include flat-mops (including sponge, scrubbing pad, and disposable pad or Swiffer type mops), string-mops, and centripetal spin-mops. Cleaning with a mop can be achieved with either a wetted mop, or a dry mop. Within each category, specialized designs exist that are best suited to either wet or dry use. For fast daily maintenance cleaning, dry flat mops are often preferred. For periodic thorough cleaning, or for larger and/or wet and dirty jobs, a wet mop is required.

In order to use a wet mop, a source of liquid is required. Until recently, this meant that a bucket of water and/or a cleaning solution, or another vessel of water, such as a sink, would need to accompany a mop. Several varieties of mops now exist with a built-in liquid supply, and application means, typically a hand operated pump and sprayer. Less commonly, products exist with a separate backpack mounted fluid tank, and a means to deliver the liquid to the mop head fibers or flat pad. These are typically for commercial or institutional use.

String-mops have proven to be the preferred choice for wet mop applications, especially when large areas of flooring must be cleaned. There are two main types of mop heads utilized within the string mop category: looped and open ended mop designs. A looped mop head utilizes a continuous string, often several hundred feet in length. This string loops back and forth repetitively. Open ended mop heads use cut lengths of string, bundled and attached together. This results in cut ends of the strings contacting the floor, and typically faster absorption of the cleaning liquid solution.

Over time, string-mops have evolved from utilizing a conventional straight string into utilizing a more durable twisted string. Twisted strings are generally formed by coiling several strands together in the same direction, where the fibers within each of the strands must twist in the opposite direction as the corresponding strands. Stitch threads are generally used to keep the fibers twisted at a particular geometry. The result is a twisted string which hangs straight and resists kinking

String-mops inherently absorb large volumes of water, whether from the cleaning solution vessel or from the flooring surface that is being cleaned. This strength is balanced by a weakness: a high level of resistance to releasing the liquid, once absorbed. As a result, several wringing mechanisms have been conceived, and are commercially available today.

While string-mops continue to be popular, they have two critical flaws. First, wringing effectiveness is dictated by the user's strength, and willingness or capability to rotate the mop's handle grip, relative to the main handle, through several full revolutions. This is both time consuming, and fatiguing. Second, each end of a twisted string must be fused together to prevent unraveling. Thus a simple tear can cause the string to become untwisted, unraveled, and unusable.

Hence, a need exists for an improved mop with a wringing mechanism that provides for substantially quicker and physically easier use and a mop head with improved durability that provides the same or increased absorbent qualities as conventional mops.

SUMMARY

The present disclosure relates to a durable cleaning mop capable of wringing water and cleaning solution out of a saturated string type mop head.

In accordance with certain aspects of the present disclosure, a mop includes a mop pole, a lower handle grip mounted around a lower portion of the mop pole and configured to move axially along the mop pole, an upper handle grip at least partially mounted around an upper portion of the mop pole and configured to move axially along the mop pole, and a rotational mechanism capable of imparting rotation into the mop pole in response to axial movement of the upper handle grip.

In accordance with certain aspects of the present disclosure, a mop head includes a collar and a braided cord comprised of a plurality of strands. The collar is positioned at a top end of the mop head and is capable of attaching around a lower portion of a lower handle grip of a mop pole. The braided cord is arranged around the collar and attached to itself such that the cord forms a plurality of apertures and a plurality of loops.

In accordance with certain aspects of the present disclosure, a collar for a mop head includes a body capable of securing a mop head to a mop pole. The collar body may include a post end and a loop end, where the loop end is configured to accept the post end. The collar is capable of attaching around a lower portion of a lower handle grip of a mop pole.

The invention may be embodied by numerous other devices and methods. The description provided herein, when taken in conjunction with the annexed drawings, discloses examples of the invention. Other embodiments, which incorporate some or all elements as taught herein, are also possible.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The various objects, advantages and novel features of this invention will be more fully apparent from a reading of the following detailed description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which like reference numerals refer to like parts, and in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates a cleaning mop in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of a rotational mechanism of the cleaning mop of FIG. 1 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 3 is an exploded view of a quick connect mechanism for the cleaning mop of FIG. 1 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of a quick connect mechanism for the cleaning mop of FIG. 1 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 5 is an exploded view of the mop head connection with the lower handle grip of FIG. 1 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 6 is a close-up view of locking structures of the cleaning mop of FIG. 1 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 7 illustrates the cleaning mop in FIG. 1 in a mopping mode in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 8 illustrates the cleaning mop in FIG. 1 in a drying mode in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 9 illustrates a mop head in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 10 is a top view of the mop head of FIG. 9 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 11 is a bottom view of the mop head of FIG. 9 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 12 illustrates a section of a continuous cord for the mop head of FIG. 9 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 13 is a cross section view of the continuous cord of FIG. 12 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 14 illustrates the mop head of FIG. 9 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

FIG. 15 is a close-up view of the interior of the mop head of FIG. 9 in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present inventive concepts now will be described more fully hereinafter in the following detailed description of the invention, in which some, but not all embodiments of the invention are described. Indeed, these inventive concepts may be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein; rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will satisfy applicable legal requirements.

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of the inventive concepts. As used herein, the term and/or includes any and all combinations of one or more of the associated listed items. As used herein, the singular forms a, an, and the are intended to include the plural forms as well as the singular forms, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

It will be further understood that the terms comprises and/or comprising, when used in this specification, specify the presence of stated features, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof.

Unless otherwise defined, all terms (including technical and scientific terms) used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one having ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. It will be further understood that terms, such as those defined in commonly used dictionaries, should be interpreted as having a meaning that is consistent with their meaning in the context of the relevant art and the present disclosure and will not be interpreted in an idealized or overly formal sense unless expressly so defined herein.

In describing the inventive concepts, it will be understood that a number of techniques and steps are disclosed. Each of these has individual benefit and each can also be used in conjunction with one or more, or in some cases all, of the other disclosed techniques. Accordingly, for the sake of clarity, this description will refrain from repeating every possible combination of the individual steps in an unnecessary fashion. Nevertheless, the specification and claims should be read with the understanding that such combinations are entirely within the scope of the invention and the claims.

The present disclosure relates to a durable cleaning mop capable of wringing water and cleaning solution out of a saturated string type mop head. It provides an improved mop and mop head, of similar construction to the previously described string-mops.

FIG. 1 illustrates a cleaning mop in accordance with certain embodiments of the present disclosure. The cleaning mop 100 includes, among other things, an upper handle grip 102, a lower handle grip 103, and a mop head 104 attached to a mop pole 101.

The upper handle grip 102 is mounted around and configured to slide axially about an upper portion of the mop pole 101 and, in some examples, can be attached to an upper locking structure 107. Additionally, the upper handle grip 102 encloses an internal rotational mechanism (not shown) that can impart rotation into the mop pole 101 when the upper handle grip 102 moves axially along the mop pole 101.

The lower handle grip 103 is mounted around and configured to slide axially about a lower portion of the mop pole 101 and, in some examples, can be attached to a lower locking structure 108. Additionally, the lower handle grip 103 is removably attached to a top end of the mop head 104.

The mop head 104 can be any looped mop head, which can attach to the lower handle grip 103 and the mop pole 101. As shown in FIG. 1, the top of the mop head 104 can be attached to the lower handle grip 103 while the bottom of the mop head 104 can be attached within a cup 106 connected to the bottom end of the mop pole 101. As a result, axial movement of the lower handle grip 103 along the mop pole 101 can stretch or relax the loops of the mop head 104.

It is also contemplated that the cleaning mop 100 can include a hook 105 secured to the top of the mop pole 101. The shape and size of the hook can vary in alternate examples to permit, inter alia, the cleaning mop 100 to hang on a wall hook.

Citations

US 9,021,648 B1 - Strength-saving spiral mop pole
A strength saving spiral mop pole has a gripping rod, an outer rod, an inner rod, a rotating module and a holding device. The outer...

US 2009 260,169 A1 - ROTARY MOP WITH ENHANCED WATER-WRINGING EFFECT
A rotary mop with enhanced water-wringing effect, including a handle; a slide sleeve fitted on the handle, the slide sleeve being rotatable about and movable...

US 2007 186,363 A1 - MOP WITH DRYING MECHANISM
A mop includes a hollow lower stick including a bottom flared part, lower longitudinal parallel grooves, and intermediate helical grooves; an upper stick slidable in...

US 2011 277,259 A1 - AUTOMATIC ROTATING MOP
An automatic rotating mop includes a force applying rod and a rotating rod. The force applying rod includes an external tube and a holding element...

US 2010 287,722 A1 - Mop With Spinning Device
A mop includes a spinning device, a shank fixed to a first end of the spinning device, an operation rod having a first end connected...

US 8,312,587 B2 - Self-rotating mop
A self-rotating mop has a mop head, a rotating rod, an actuating assembly and a top pole. The rotating rod is connected securely to the...

US 2012 233,794 A1 - MOP WITH SPINNING DEVICE
A mop includes a handle connected to one end of a first rod. The other end of the first rod is connected to a second...

US 8,316,502 B2 - Spin dry mop
A spin dry mop includes an outer tube and a handle fitting over the outer tube. The handle is made of a different material than...

US 2007 151,059 A1 - Mop head to mop handle connecting system and method
A mop connection system employs a mop head support member permanently attached at one end to the cleaning elements of a mop head. Dual arm...

US 8,407,845 B2 - Mop with spinning device
A mop including a spinning member, a spiral rod, an extendable rod, a mop head, and a pressing rod is provided. The spinning member includes...

US 8,739,347 B2 - Spiral drive mechanism and spin mop with the same
A spin mop includes a spiral drive mechanism and a mop head. The spiral drive mechanism includes an upper rod, a sleeve axially secured on...

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Assignee
INGENIOUS DESIGNS LLC
Inventors
Joy Mangano, Thomas James Philpott, Robert Patrick Warren
Filing date
September 28 2015
Publication date
March 19 2019
Table of contents
Classifications
CPC: A47L13/14, A47L13/142, A47L13/20, A47L13/24, A47L13/252
IPC: A47L13/14, A47L13/142, A47L13/20, A47L13/24, A47L13/252